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In the work, And the crew were much pleased when they found it to be a map they could all understand, a vinyl wall installation adopts the visual conventions of mapping, depicting a 10-foot-long grid seemingly disrupted by a ‘bump’. Part of an ongoing project investigating the phantom landmass Sandy Island, this work references technological glitching in virtual maps. Similar disruptions in the representation of space are still visible in satellite maps of the nonexistent Sandy Island, appearing as a kind of bulge in the ‘surface’ of Google Earth. The title of the work is drawn from Lewis Carroll’s description of an absurd map in his epic poem, “The Hunting of the Snark”; depicting the ocean, the map is completely blank, and thus, perfectly understandable.

and the crew were much pleased when they found it to be a map they could all understand
and the crew were much pleased when they found it to be a map they could all understand
Vinyl
28 x 118 in.
2017